Monday, 10 December 2012

STUDY TASK - ACCENTS

French Accent:




Source: graphicsfairy

1903 French Invoice



French Invoice


Ornamental French Typography

Source: graphicsfairy

French Advertising
German Accent:


Source: armindaborges

Source: dribbble

Geordie Accent:



Aal Aboot Geordie by David Simpson

Pirate Accent:

Stereotypical pirate accents tend to resemble accents either from Cornwall, South Devon or Bristol in South West England, though they can also be based on Elizabethan era English or other parts of the world. Pirates in film, television and theatre are generally depicted as speaking English in a particular accent and speech pattern that sounds like a cross between a West Country accent and an old English accent, patterned on that ofRobert Newton's performance as Long John Silver in the 1950 film Treasure Island.

Source: de-war.de

Illustrated Pirate saying for a magazine in Mexico, by Axel Peemoeller

Source: sharesomecandy

Source: vickynewman

Nautical Theme Hand Rendered Type

Source: webanddesigners

Welsh Accent:

Source: andsomeplyers
Got to create a documents in Welsh? Getting frustrated that not all the welsh characters are in the font you have chosen? Us too. We find that the most common character missing from font sets is ‘ŵ’. How about you? I sense a mass shout of ‘Yes! Goddammit!

Well here’s a handy short list of our top 5 typefaces which include the elusive character for quick reference so you don’t have to resort to Times and Myriad (again!).
Chosen as a good display typeface and primarily for it’s caps. Not so great for body text but super for headers and headlines. Very in vogue at the moment too.
Included as a nice alternative to Times New Roman. It’s great for body copy and the italics are rather pleasant too.
Picked primarily for it’s italics, it’s another serif font a la Times but it’s always nice to have a few alternatives to set your document out from the rest.
Absolutely classic typeface and found installed on most computers but often neglected in favour of Arial and Helvetica, great sans serif which both works well for display and body text.
A nice condensed type face for when space is at a premium, it remains legible at small point sizes and is another good alternative to the standard sans serifs most people use. Part of the DIN font family.

Yorkshire Accent:

Source: frontideas



Irish Accent:

Source: lostcarpark

Source: etsy

Source: philatelynews

Essex Accent:

Source: fontbros

Scouse Accent:



"Design a font for the Scouse Accent"
Source: ilikedoodle

Jamaican Accent:

Source: jamaica50


Source: ufonts

Russian Accent:


Source: ffonts

Source: behance

Australian Accent:
Source: typecamp

Source: luc.devroye





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