Saturday, 30 November 2013

BRACKETS & PARENTHESIS CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

After re writing the brief, and considering my initial ideas, I looked into brackets below, leading me on to Parenthesis, and the idea of an after thought, which is the concept I plan to use for this brief. I plan to show this through different characters and how this can change tone of voice and meaning through type and content.

Below is the initial research of key words and terminology for Parenthesis and how it is used to clarify for myself, my tutors and the potential user.


Brackets ( ) [ ]


There are two main types of brackets.
Round brackets
Round brackets (also called parentheses) are mainly used to separate off information that isn’t essential to the meaning of the rest of the sentence. If you removed the bracketed material the sentence would still make perfectly good sense. 
Square brackets 
Square brackets are mainly used to enclose words added by someone other than the original writer or speaker, typically in order to clarify the situation.

Parentheses:
noun (plural parentheses /-siːz/)
1. A word or phrase inserted as an explanation or afterthought into a passage which is grammatically complete without it, in writing usually marked off by brackets, dashes, or commas: in a challenging parenthesis, Wordsworth comments on the evil effects of contemporary developments


(parentheses) a pair of round brackets ( ) used to mark off a parenthetical word or phrase: the stage number is added in parentheses to the name or formula
.

2. An interlude or interval:the three months of coalition government were a lamentable political parenthesis.

Phrases
In parenthesis:
1. As a digression or afterthought:
In parenthesis I should say that I am passing quickly over the significance of these matters
2. Shown through punctuation such and grammar such as # , : () [] – through type.

Origin:
Mid 16th century: via late Latin from Greek, from parentithenai 'put in beside'

Grammar:
When something is put ‘in parenthesis’ it is separated off from the main part of the sentence by a pair of brackets, commas, or dashes. This is usually because it contains information or ideas that are not essential to an understanding of the sentence:

With the homeless now crowding the streets of cities that once hardly knew them (like Portland, Oregon), Clinton has effectively criminalized the poor. Or because they form a comment by the author on the rest of the sentence:
The poor, says Clinton (he means blacks and Hispanics), have been ‘demotivated’ by welfare and forced into a ‘welfare’ culture.

Brackets are the most formal (and most obvious) way of showing parenthesis:
With the homeless now crowding the streets of cities that once hardly knew them (like Portland, Oregon), Clinton has effectively criminalized the poor.

Commas are less forceful:
With the homeless now crowding the streets of cities that once hardly knew them, like Portland, Oregon, Clinton has effectively criminalized the poor.

Dashes are the least formal:
With the homeless now crowding the streets of cities that once hardly knew them — like Portland, Oregon — Clinton has effectively criminalized the poor.

Spelling rule:
Make the plural by changing the -is ending to -es: (parentheses).
oxforddictionaries

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